Tag Archives: bike

Feelmore Adult Gallery + Pedal Express = Instant Gratification

By Dominic Lucchesi

I remember when Feelmore Adult Gallery opened in downtown Oakland a few years back.  My partner and I poked our heads into the shop late one night.  The welcoming attitude of the staff, and the laid-back nature of the space made me feel comfortable – generally not the first adjective most would choose to describe your average adult store.  I’ve popped in a few times since then, and have enjoyed watching Feelmore become a prominent, progressive member of the local business community.

Pedal Express is proud to announce that we are partnering with Feelmore to offer local, same-day delivery of a wide variety of sex toys and products beginning May 1st.  We are stoked to be working with Feelmore – a local business that’s as bike friendly as it is sex positive (very!).

“Since opening, we have allowed bikes to be parked in the store while our clients shop… With delivery, we are taking things a step further, as it is a win for everyone.  Removing gear, securing the bike and packing away the helmet for a bottle of glycerin/paraben-free lube takes dedication.  Feelmore wants to take the stress out of shopping.”

To celebrate National Bike Month (and, coincidently, National Masturbation Month), deliveries during the month of May will include a free gift with online purchases.  In addition, cyclists coming into the shop will receive ten percent off their purchase.

feelmore ebx

Nenna was kind enough to answer a few of our questions about Feelmore, bikes and East Bay living…

Who are you and what do you do?

My name is Nenna and I own Feelmore Adult Gallery which is a progressive adult store.  We opened February 14, 2011 with a lot of hard work.  We are located at 1703 Telegraph Ave in the Uptown District of Downtown Oakland.

Your favorite thing(s) about living/working in the East Bay?

My favorite things about living/working in the East Bay is that you can find so much.  From the type of work, food, people, sexual perspectives, and information…You can literally get full yet want more.  But more importantly, the great majority of small businesses that make up the area.  There are so many unique businesses out there that can support Feelmore’s expansion and vision.  We will continue to ask our Social Network community with whom we should partner to meet their needs!

Why did you choose to work with Pedal Express?

I posted a question on Facebook that I would like to offer bike delivery for our products and someone on our timeline suggested we try Pedal Express.  After doing my research, I saw that they [Pedal Express] are a cooperative and I’m potentially looking to move Feelmore towards a co-op – it just made sense.  

I like the ownership mentality in my business and see the smiles and professionalism that Pedal Express has demonstrated even before our first order.  This also gives Feelmore a chance to be sustainable and eco-friendly as we become more invested in our community.  With Pedal Express being in business for 20-years, our clients can trust that their privacy will be protected as all packages will arrive in wrapped packaging by a company that has a quality reputation.

What kind of products does Feelmore offer?

We sell everything in the sex toy universe.  Our expectation is for customers to purchase products that they need in a hurry, or don’t have access to public transportation, or simply would like to support keeping their car off the road.

Why is it important for you to operate a bike friendly business?

Feelmore has been bike friendly since day one.  Oakland is steadily getting up to speed on what the community needs, but a huge need for many cyclists are bike racks.  As we did not have any in front of our store, we let people know they were able to bring their bikes in for safety.  In fact, I want to make sure all of our future expansions are also bike friendly.  In the past, we partnered with a local bike shop on a workshop entitled: ‘Bike Safety for Sex Workers’ as a way to teach bike safety for sex workers that are using their bikes to get to and from appointments.  There is more than one way for Feelmore to interact with the biking community as a cooperative component.

Bike to Work Day, ERR Day: an Instagram Alleycat

Bike to Work Day is coming up on Thursday, May 8th.  BTWD is an annual event held during the spring across the United States that promotes cycling as an all-around great way to commute  to work.  There will be Energizer Stations, set up across the Bay Area to provide encouragement, free food, coffee, and schwag to bike commuters.

Coincidentally, this event provides the makings for an interesting DIY alleycat.

I don’t know if anything like this has been done before, so bear with us as we present Bike to Work Day Errday, the first Instagram Alleycat.

Bike to Work Day, ERR Day

How Does it Work?

Energizer Stations will be set up throughout the Bay Area on Bike to Work Day.  The goal of the race is to visit as many as possible.  The person(s) who visits the most Energizer Stations, wins.

Energizer Station

Click here for a map of East Bay Energizer Stations.  And here for a SF map.

How do you know who makes it to a checkpoint?

Simple: Instagram.  You must take a picture at every Energizer Station that you visit, and post it to your Instagram feed (yes, you must have an Instagram account to participate).  In order to be counted, each photo must have three things:

  1. The location
  2. Use the hashtag #btwdERRday
  3. Mention @pedxcourier (so we can tally up the results)

#btwdERRDAY

There will be literally hundreds of Energizer Stations set up across the Bay Area.  Feel free to visit as many (or as few) as you want.  Have fun with it – stop to chat with the volunteers, eat some snacks, drink hella coffee, but don’t forget to ‘Gram!

What else do I need to know?

This is a pretty casual “race.”  There is no starting place and there is no finish line.  The goal is to have FUN while celebrating your favorite mode of transit: the bicycle.

Any and all Energizer Stations from Oakland to Concord to San Francisco are valid checkpoints.  We will keep track of the race via Instagram.

Most Energizer Stations are open from 7am ’til 9am, so this will be the official race time (early bird gets the worm!!) .

There is no entry fee.

There will be an after party at Pedal Express HQ (1501 Powell St, Emeryville) from 5:30 – 7:30pm.  Come through after work and hang out with your favorite bike messengers!  We’ll fire up the grill and have a cooler or two full of beverages; we’ll also hand out spoke cards and announce the winner(s).  We’ll try and rustle up some prizes for ya too (holler at me, if you want to donate).

Emeryville Energizer Station

Anyone down for a full day of bike shenanigans won’t want to miss this.  See you on the streets!

– Dom, Nick, Savanna & Kevin (Pedal Express)

* Later on in the evening, there will be a bike film screening of Aftermass: Bicycling in a Post-Critical Mass Portland.  Film starts at 8:30 and is right down the street from us at PLACE for Sustainable Living.  For event info, click here.

Aftermass

De Fietskoerier Utrecht: “The Utrecht Bicycle Messengers”

By Dominic Lucchesi

The Netherlands

Continuing our look at Bicycle Courier Companies worldwide, this entry takes us to the Netherlands.   A country known for it’s extensive network of bicycle paths and facilities, the Netherlands appears to be a cyclist’s dream.  27% of the country’s trips are made by bicycle – this figure jumps to 59% in its cities (for context, the bike mode share in Oakland is 1.8%; in Berkeley, it’s 8.0%).  So, you can see why we’d be interested to know what life is like for a bicycle courier in that part of the globe.

Utrecht

Some time ago, I chatted with Tobias of De Fietskoerier Utrecht (The Utrecht Bicycle Messengers).  Utrecht is the fourth largest city in the Netherlands.  Interestingly, due to its central location, Utrecht is an important hub for the country’s rail and road transport.   It’s also been the religious center of the Netherlands since the 8th Century.  Neat.

A super cool dude, here’s what Tobias had to say about his profession:

Who are you and where do you operate? And for how long?

We are “De Fietskoerier Utrecht” (translated as “TheUtrecht Bicycle Messengers”) and as our name says, we operate in Utrecht and around.  In January 2014 we celebrate[d] our tenth birthday.  

Can you give us an example of a typical delivery and an atypical delivery?

Difficult, we really do everything.  A lot of work to and from the chamber of commerce and the courthouse, furthermore a lot of design companies and printing companies.  A growing amount of medical deliveries, such as blood, medicines (and sometimes  even a lung).  As well, people call us to send boxes to Mexico, for now we only do the first few kilometers on bicycle…

What kind of bike(s) do you use?

Mostly fixed gear, but also regular racing bikes, single speeds, MTBs and cargo bikes (Bullitt). Also, we have a solar powered electric car for larger deliveries.

Any on-the-job challenges that you may face?

5 different messengers on the road on the same time can be a challenge to manage, however, in the end it always works out fine.

How many riders are in your crew?

We are a collective with 9 owners. Furthermore a group of about 8 freelancers help us out .

What does the future hold for the bicycle courier industry?

More work, also more work in between cities, with for example a train or car in between. 

So there you have it, ladies and gentlemen: De Fietskoerier Utrecht!

Click here for a short intro movie for the De Fietskoerier Endurance Team.
"A picture of the team just after the World Championships bicycle racing in the Netherlands last year"
“A picture of the team just after the World Championships bicycle racing in the Netherlands last year”
"A picture of our solar powered electric car with messenger Gijs"
“A picture of our solar powered electric car with messenger Gijs”

Lastly, for bicycle courier service in Oakland, Berkeley and Emeryville, make sure to check out the crew at Pedal Express!

Bay Area Cyclists: An Afterthought

By Dominic Lucchesi

Disclaimer:  The following is an admittedly emotional and reactionary rant.  Sorry for all the doom and gloom, but I had to vent.  I swear, I’ll be back to my usual, chipper self in the morning.  Continue reading at your own peril.

The news that a cyclist was struck and killed by a truck at 6th and Folsom in San Francisco this morning really hit me in the gut.

I have been working on my bicycle in the Bay Area for roughly six years now (yes, I get paid to ride my bike).  Four of those years was spent riding primarily in San Francisco.  I’ve spent the last two as a worker-owner at Pedal Express, a small bicycle courier company operating in Oakland, Berkeley and Emeryville.

I do not own a car.  This means that even when I’m not working, I am riding my bike.  To the store to pick up groceries; to the bar to grab drinks with the homies; even riding to visit my family in East Oakland and San Leandro.  What this experience has provided me with is a unique, street-level view of life in the Bay Area.

I notice little changes in the streetscape that others may not see.  I can tell when I’m leaving Emeryville and entering Oakland by the drop in quality of the street pavement.  For years and months I waited in agony while construction crews worked to complete a short section of the Bay Trail at the Berkeley Marina.  I’ve seen potholes come and go and then come back again…

At the same time, I’ve watched the bicycle infrastructure grow in San Francisco, greatly exceeding anything that we have in the East Bay (colored pavement, protected bike lanes, bike traffic signals, etc).

And if San Francisco represents the most bike-friendly city in the Bay, what does that make Berkeley or Oakland?  While SF is busy transforming Market Street, efforts to add safe bike lanes on Tunnel Rd are in serious jeopardy because the neighbors don’t want to give up a few on-street parking spots.  On 40th St, attempts to add bike lanes were nixed in favor of adding little sharrows and a green strip of paint DOWN THE MIDDLE OF A TRAVEL LANE.  And nobody really seems to know about it.

Despite all the hype and political sweet talk, I can’t help but feel that cyclists are a complete afterthought both locally and nationally.  Me and all of my bike-riding friends are one right turn away from being struck from existence.   And if that happens, regardless of the circumstances, the internet will be buzzing with comments like this:

From my experience commuting to work on a bike is that many riders I see need a basic bike safety course. They appear to create hazards where one shouldn’t exist usually out of impatience.

Ugh.  I swear, it’s almost enough to make a guy give up the bike messenger biz in favor of a desk job and a nice, safe, gas-guzzling Hummer.

Vélo Courier: Porto Alegre, Brazil

By Dominic Lucchesi

Pedal Express continues our look at bicycle couriers across the globe.  Our latest installment brings us to South America where we got in touch with Alex, worker-owner at Vélo Courier out of Porto Alegre, Brazil.

A real nice dude, read on to find out what he had to say about the bike messenger bizness.  Please note, the Google translation kind of chewed up the responses in English, so I edited them a tad.  We have included a full transcript in the native Portugese at the bottom of the post!

Who are you and where do you operate? And for how long?

My name is Alex, and I work at Vélo Courier.  I’m from Porto Alegre – Brasil.  I started working as a bike courier a year ago, after I decided to leave the office life and be happy.

Example of a typical delivery and an atypical delivery?

We usually transport envelopes, letters, small boxes, etc.  A great example of an unusual delivery, was the time I had to carry a microwave for technical assistance (in the back).

What kind of bike(s) do you use?
Generally steel frames, old bikes with fixed gear, due to low maintenance costs.
On-the-job challenges that you may face?
The main one is the hostility in traffic.  For here, unfortunately, the bike is still not well accepted in traffic. Other challenges are long distance deliveries or too heavy.
 
Number of riders/employees/owners?
6.

What does the future hold for the bicycle courier industry?
Everything, the bike will take the power back!  Unfortunately here in Brazil, the market supply consists mostly of couriers on motorcycles, the famous “moto-boys”, who are, as some would say a “necessary evil” for their violent behavior through the traffic scares a bit.
(Sorry for the english.  “Google Translate” is really why we are not good in your language. I hope you understand, hehe.)
 
Thank you for contacting!  Abraço!
Who are you and where do you operate? And for how long?
Me chamo Alex, tenho 21 anos e trabalho na Vélo Courier, em Porto Alegre – Brasil.
Comecei a trabalhar como mensageiros à cerca de dois anos, quando decidi largar um emprego medíocre e ser feliz logo de uma vez. A cooperativa onde trabalho atualmente tem apenas 6 meses de existência, trabalhei como “free-lancer” antes de fundá-la.
 
Example of a typical delivery and an atypical delivery?
Geralmente transportamos pequenos pacotes, como pequenas caixas, envelopes, cartas, cd’s, flores, etc etc.
Uma entrega atípica, no meu caso e experiência, foi o dia em que tive de transportar um aparelho de microondas para a assistência técnica. Foi muito difícil, pois a mochila era ruim e o aparelho era muito pesado e desengonçado.
 
What kind of bike(s) do you use?
Uso bikes de pinha fixa, como a grande maioria dos funcionários da nossa cooperativa. Tem menores custos de manutenção.
 
On-the-job challenges that you may face?
Pedalar por aqui já é o maior desafio, pois nosso país ainda está caminhando para aceitar a bicicleta como veículo no trânsito. O maior desafio é e sempre será sair pra trabalhar e voltar vivo pra casa.
 
Number of riders/employees/owners?
6.
What does the future hold for the bicycle courier industry?
Tudo! A bicicleta retomará o controle, pelo menos trabalho de 2 à 5hs pedalando para humanizar o trânsito e mostrar às pessoas que uma cidade melhor só depende de nós. Nossa missão, como dizemos, não é passar a vida inteira quase morrendo no trânsito para entregar pacotes de pessoas que não querem correr esse risco, não somos uma rede de fast food, estamos humanizando a cidade para que todos possam transitar em paz por ela.
Novamente, agradeço o carinho e a oportunidade!  Abraço!

Bicycle Couriers: A Global Profession

The bicycle courier industry is not a new one.  In fact, it’s origins can be traced back to the mid 19th-Century, coinciding with the rise in popularity of early velocipedes.

1911-adamsexpress-messengers

Today, despite the rise of fax machines and email, bicycle courier companies can be found in cities and towns across the globe.  Because of their ability to avoid unexpected holdups – traffic jams, parking restrictions, tickets and fines – bicycle messengers provides a unique and dependable service that is unmatched by other forms of motorized delivery.

Pedal Express takes pride in being part of a long tradition of bicycle couriers.  The industry itself is incredibly diverse and far-reaching, and we are constantly on the lookout for new companies from which to learn from.

One of our goals for this blog space is to showcase other bicycle courier companies that we admire.  We hope that these posts will help you (the reader) better understand what it is that bicycle messengers do.

For those of us in the industry, we hope that these posts provide a bit of global context and help better connect and inspire bicycle couriers worldwide.

Pedala Bike Messengers (Quezon City, Philippines)

Pedala Bike Messengers, Inc. currently serves the people and businesses of Metro Manila.  Now, I’ve never been to the Philippines, but from what I understand, Manila is a gnarly place to ride a bike.  Whether it’s fighting for space on streets notorious for it’s traffic jams, breathing in lung-fulls of polluted air, or braving the often harsh tropical monsoon climate, the Pedala Messengers seem to ride through it all with a smile on their faces:

Pedala offers an affordable, same-day delivery service.  A one way delivery will cost you P100 (about $2.44); a roundtrip delivery goes for P200.  Need a rush delivery?  No problem, just double the price and they will add your job to the top of the queue.  Clients can place an order via phone, email or text.

Perhaps the most admirable thing about Pedala is it’s unabashed commitment to environmental and social best-practices.  While it may seem an obvious thing to do, not every bicycle courier company actively tries to promote cycling as a way to improve community health.  Pedala’s efforts to connect the dots become even more meaningful when considering that air pollution across Asia has reached epidemic levels.  Smog in Manila alone is directly linked to thousands of deaths each year.

From the Pedala website:

Pedala Bike Messengers, Inc. is a social enterprise, a business that considers three bottom lines: profit, environmental action, and social gains.

Pedala offers cost-effective, if not faster, same-day delivery courier services primarily for small and medium enterprises. The company strikes a symbiotic relationship with its clients: as Pedala earns profits for itself it saves costs, and time, for its clientele.

Pedala also believes in promoting the use of bicycles as a means to minimize the use of fuel, lower pollution levels, and thus allow for safer, cleaner air. Because it doesn’t use gasoline, Pedala is a non-polluting enterprise that doesn’t burn fossil fuels, consequently lowering its clients’ carbon footprint.

As a social objective, Pedala seeks to hire cyclists and athletes who want to train for competitions at the same time earn something for their efforts. With many athletes eager to develop physical endurance as well as promote better environmental practices like biking, Pedala’s roster of cyclists is constantly growing. Biking for Pedala has, indeed, become a badge of honor.

pedala